Electric Home Safety

 

General Saftey Tips

Electrical safety begins with proper wiring. Wiring should be installed and checked by a qualified electrician. Every home should have at least a 100-amp service (200-amp service or larger for homes heated electrically).

  • All appliances and electrical cords should carry approval of the Underwriter's Laboratory (UL) or some other authorized laboratory.
  • Plugs on electrical appliance cords should be the grounded, three-prong type.
  • Check cords for wear, especially at plugs and connections.
  • Keep cords away from heat and water. Do not wrap cords around any metal device or pipe. Keep cords out of the way so people won't trip over them.
  • Never disconnect an appliance by pulling on the cord. Always pull the plug.
  • All convenience outlets should be grounded.
  • Electrical outlets for outdoor use should be weatherproof.
  • Every major appliance should have its own circuit.
  • Do not use or handle appliances if you are wet or are standing on a wet surface. Do not use electrical tools or appliances outdoors if it is raining or is wet.
  • Power tools should have heavy duty, grounded cords.
  • Moisture resistant appliance cords should be used outdoors.
  • Do not operate an electric lawn mower in wet grass.
  • All antennas should be grounded.
  • Teach your children not to fly kites near power lines.
  • Do not touch electrical wires that have fallen . . . they may be energized.
  • Never go inside the fence around a power substation.
  • Never install metal objects, such as CB or TV antennas closer than twice their height to the nearest electric power line.
  • Never use metal elevators, metal irrigation pipes, well digging equipment, metal ladders or other metal equipment near power lines.
  • Make sure every family member knows the location of the main fuses or circuit breaker for the residence and understands how to operate it in case of an emergency.  
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